Global Exporting Fuels The Auto Industry's Growth


Exports Fuel A Growing Auto Industry

In 2013, over 2.1 million vehicles assembled in the United States were exported to our North American neighbors and around the globe, supporting millions of American manufacturing, design, port facility and shipping jobs across the country. In just the past two years, U.S. auto factories increased exports by almost 364,000 vehicles (21 percent), and have grown auto exports by 30 percent in just decade.1

The strong 2013 export numbers continued a trend of greater auto shipments – many sent beyond America’s neighboring countries. The U.S. International Trade Administration reported in 2012 over one million cars and light trucks were exported from the U.S. to markets outside North America – over three times the number of cars shipped in 2003.2


1. WardsAuto, Data Center, wardsauto.com/data-center

2. Christina Rogers and Neal E. Boudette, “A Revitalized Car Industry Cranks Up U.S. Exports,” Wall Street Journal, 7/2/13

 

What are the Busiest Ports for Automotive Exports?

Auto Export Ports

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U.S. Auto Exports At A Glance

  • Between 2009 and 2013, the U.S. exported $227.7 billion worth of passenger vehicles across the globe. (USA Trade, Foreign Trade Division, U.S. Census Bureau, usatrade.census.gov, Accessed 5/7/14)

  • In 2013, the U.S. exported $57.1 billion worth of cars and light trucks – a 101 percent increase from the $28.8 billion shipped in 2009. (USA Trade, Foreign Trade Division, U.S. Census Bureau, usatrade.census.gov, Accessed 5/7/14)

  • In 2013, the top five export markets for vehicles assembled in the U.S. were Canada, China, Saudi Arabia, Germany and Mexico. (Office Of Trade And Industry Information (OTII), Manufacturing And Services, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department Of Commerce)

  • In 2013, the U.S. shipped $8.4 billion of automobiles to the European Union – over the past five years, the value of vehicles exported to the EU amounted to over $41 billion. (USA Trade, Foreign Trade Division, U.S. Census Bureau, usatrade.census.gov, Accessed 5/7/14)

  • In just the past five years, U.S. vehicle exports to China have totaled $22.4 billion. In 2013 alone, the U.S. exported $8.5 billion worth of vehicles to China – an increase of 683 percent from 2009. (USA Trade, Foreign Trade Division, U.S. Census Bureau, Usatrade.Census.Gov, Accessed 5/7/14)

  • Leading the nation, the Port of Baltimore alone shipped vehicles worth $6.9 billion from its terminals – about 12 percent of the value of all auto shipments from the U.S. Other leading ports included Jacksonville, FL ($6.7 billion), Charleston, SC ($6.4 billion), and Detroit, MI ($4.5 billion). (USA Trade, Foreign Trade Division, U.S. Census Bureau, usatrade.census.gov, Accessed 5/7/14)

  • On the West Coast, the Aberdeen-Hoquiam Port led the way with $3.6 billion of auto exports in 2013, followed by Long Beach, CA with $1.5 billion. (USA Trade, Foreign Trade Division, U.S. Census Bureau, usatrade.census.gov, Accessed 5/7/14)

  • Over the past five years, $18.2 billion worth of new vehicles have been shipped from Charleston, SC to the EU, while an additional $8.1 billion in autos was exported to Europe from Brunswick, GA. (USA Trade, Foreign Trade Division, U.S. Census Bureau, usatrade.census.gov, Accessed 5/7/14)

  • The Port of Charleston was the leading exporter to China, shipping $2.4 billion. (USA Trade, Foreign Trade Division, U.S. Census Bureau, usatrade.census.gov, Accessed 5/7/14)

 

Auto Jobs & Ports

The greater auto industry supports over 8 million jobs in the United States. As a major automotive exporter, communities such as Baltimore benefit from auto related exports.

John Griffin, Manager of International Port Operations for Chrysler sums it up:

"We're building cars here in the United States, and shipping them out to other countries. They are vehicles that they can’t get anywhere, except those built in the United States. It's really great to know that other parts of the world view our vehicles as more valuable, more desirable, than those built in their own countries."

Learn more about John's story, and the jobs supported by automotive exports here:

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